Flutter GraphQL

version MIT License All Contributors PRs Welcome

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Table of Contents

About this project

GraphQL brings many benefits, both to the client: devices will need less requests, and therefore reduce data useage. And to the programer: requests are arguable, they have the same structure as the request.

This project combines the benefits of GraphQL with the benefits of Streams in Dart to deliver a high performace client.

The project took inspriation from the Apollo GraphQL client, great work guys!

Note: Still in Beta Docs is coming soon Support for all Apollo Graphql component supported props is coming soon

Installation

First depend on the library by adding this to your packages pubspec.yaml:

dependencies:
  flutter_graphql: ^1.0.0-rc.1

Now inside your Dart code you can import it.

import 'package:flutter_graphql/flutter_graphql.dart';

Usage

To use the client it first needs to be initialized with an link and cache. For this example we will be uing an HttpLink as our link and InMemoryCache as our cache. If your endpoint requires authentication you can provide some custom headers to HttpLink.

For this example we will use the public GitHub API.

...

import 'package:flutter_graphql/flutter_graphql.dart';

void main() {
  HttpLink link = HttpLink(
    uri: 'https://api.github.com/graphql',
    headers: <String, String>{
      'Authorization': 'Bearer <YOUR_PERSONAL_ACCESS_TOKEN>',
    },
  );

  ValueNotifier<GraphQLClient> client = ValueNotifier(
    GraphQLClient(
      cache: InMemoryCache(),
      link: link,
    ),
  );

  ...
}

...

GraphQL Provider

In order to use the client, you Query and Mutation widgets to be wrapped with the GraphQLProvider widget.

We recommend wrapping your MaterialApp with the GraphQLProvider widget.

  ...

  return GraphQLProvider(
    client: client,
    child: MaterialApp(
      title: 'Flutter Demo',
      ...
    ),
  );

  ...

Offline Cache

The in-memory cache can automatically be saved to and restored from offline storage. Setting it up is as easy as wrapping your app with the CacheProvider widget.

It is required to place the CacheProvider widget is inside the GraphQLProvider widget, because GraphQLProvider makes client available trough the build context.

...

class MyApp extends StatelessWidget {
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return GraphQLProvider(
      client: client,
      child: CacheProvider(
        child: MaterialApp(
          title: 'Flutter Demo',
          ...
        ),
      ),
    );
  }
}

...

You can setup authentication headers and other custom links just like you do with Apollo Graphql

  import 'dart:async';

  import 'package:flutter/material.dart';
  import 'package:flutter_graphql/flutter_graphql.dart';
  import 'package:flutter_graphql/src/link/operation.dart';
  import 'package:flutter_graphql/src/link/fetch_result.dart';

  class AuthLink extends Link {
    AuthLink()
        : super(
      request: (Operation operation, [NextLink forward]) {
        StreamController<FetchResult> controller;

        Future<void> onListen() async {
          try {
            var token = await AuthUtil.getToken();
            operation.setContext(<String, Map<String, String>>{
              'headers': <String, String>{'Authorization': '''bearer $token'''}
            });
          } catch (error) {
            controller.addError(error);
          }

          await controller.addStream(forward(operation));
          await controller.close();
        }

        controller = StreamController<FetchResult>(onListen: onListen);

        return controller.stream;
      },
    );
  }

  var cache = InMemoryCache();

  var authLink = AuthLink()
      .concat(HttpLink(uri: 'http://yourgraphqlserver.com/graphql'));
      
  final ValueNotifier<GraphQLClient> client = ValueNotifier(
    GraphQLClient(
      cache: cache,
      link: authLink,
    ),
  );

  final ValueNotifier<GraphQLClient> anotherClient = ValueNotifier(
    GraphQLClient(
      cache: cache,
      link: authLink,
    ),
  );
    

However note that flutter-graphql does not inject __typename into operations the way apollo does, so if you aren't careful to request them in your query, this normalization scheme is not possible.

Normalization

To enable apollo-like normalization, use a NormalizedInMemoryCache:

ValueNotifier<GraphQLClient> client = ValueNotifier(
  GraphQLClient(
    cache: NormalizedInMemoryCache(
      dataIdFromObject: typenameDataIdFromObject,
    ),
    link: link,
  ),
);

dataIdFromObject is required and has no defaults. Our implementation is similar to apollo's, requiring a function to return a universally unique string or null. The predefined typenameDataIdFromObject we provide is similar to apollo's default:

String typenameDataIdFromObject(Object object) {
  if (object is Map<String, Object> &&
      object.containsKey('__typename') &&
      object.containsKey('id')) {
    return "${object['__typename']}/${object['id']}";
  }
  return null;
}

However note that flutter-graphql does not inject __typename into operations the way apollo does, so if you aren't careful to request them in your query, this normalization scheme is not possible.

Queries

To create a query, you just need to define a String variable like the one below. With full support of fragments

const GET_ALL_PEOPLE = '''
  query getPeople{
    readAll{
      name
      age
      sex
    }
  }
''';

In your widget:

...

Query(
  options: QueryOptions(
    document: GET_ALL_PEOPLE, // this is the query string you just created
    pollInterval: 10,
  ),
  builder: (QueryResult result) {
    if (result.errors != null) {
      return Text(result.errors.toString());
    }

    if (result.loading) {
      return Text('Loading');
    }

    // it can be either Map or List
    List people = result.data['getPeople'];

    return ListView.builder(
      itemCount: people.length,
      itemBuilder: (context, index) {
        final repository = people[index];

        return Text(people['name']);
    });
  },
);

...

Other examples with query argments and passing in a custom graphql client

const READ_BY_ID = '''
  query readById(\$id: String!){
    readById(ID: \$id){
      name
      age
      sex
    }
  }
  
  
final ValueNotifier<GraphQLClient> userClient = ValueNotifier(
  GraphQLClient(
    cache: cache,
    link: authLinkProfile,
  ),
);

''';

In your widget:

...

Query(
  options: QueryOptions(
    document: READ_BY_ID, // this is the query string you just created
    pollInterval: 10,
    client: userClient.value
  ),
  builder: (QueryResult result) {
    if (result.errors != null) {
      return Text(result.errors.toString());
    }

    if (result.loading) {
      return Text('Loading');
    }

    // it can be either Map or List
    List person = result.data['getPeople'];

    return Text(person['name']);
  },
);

...

Mutations

Again first create a mutation string:

const LIKE_BLOG = '''
  mutation likeBlog(\$id: Int!) {
    likeBlog(id: \$id){
      name
      author {
        name
        displayImage
      }
  }
''';

The syntax for mutations is fairly similar to that of a query. The only diffence is that the first argument of the builder function is a mutation function. Just call it to trigger the mutations (Yeah we deliberately stole this from react-apollo.)

...

Mutation(
  options: MutationOptions(
    document: LIKE_BLOG, // this is the mutation string you just created
  ),
  builder: (
    RunMutation runMutation,
    QueryResult result,
  ) {
    return FloatingActionButton(
      onPressed: () => runMutation({
        'id': <BLOG_ID>,
      }),
      tooltip: 'Star',
      child: Icon(Icons.star),
    );
  },
);

...

Subscriptions (Experimental)

The syntax for subscriptions is again similar to a query, however, this utilizes WebSockets and dart Streams to provide real-time updates from a server. Before subscriptions can be performed a global intance of socketClient needs to be initialized.

We are working on moving this into the same GraphQLProvider stucture as the http client. Therefore this api might change in the near future.

socketClient = await SocketClient.connect('ws://coolserver.com/graphql');

Once the socketClient has been initialized it can be used by the Subscription Widget

class _MyHomePageState extends State<MyHomePage> {
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return Scaffold(
      body: Center(
        child: Subscription(
          operationName,
          query,
          variables: variables,
          builder: ({
            bool loading,
            dynamic payload,
            dynamic error,
          }) {
            if (payload != null) {
              return Text(payload['requestSubscription']['requestData']);
            } else {
              return Text('Data not found');
            }
          }
        ),
      )
    );
  }
}

Graphql Consumer

You can always access the client direcly from the GraphQLProvider but to make it even easier you can also use the GraphQLConsumer widget. You can also pass in a another client to the consumer

  ...

  return GraphQLConsumer(
    builder: (GraphQLClient client) {
      // do something with the client

      return Container(
        child: Text('Hello world'),
      );
    },
  );

  ...

A different client:

  ...

  return GraphQLConsumer(
    client: userClient,
    builder: (GraphQLClient client) {
      // do something with the client

      return Container(
        child: Text('Hello world'),
      );
    },
  );

  ...

Fragments

There is support for fragments and it's basically how you use it in Apollo React. For example define your fragment as a dart String.

  ...
const UserFragment = '''
  fragment UserFragmentFull on Profile {
    address {
      city
      country
      postalCode
      street
    }
    birthdate
    email
    firstname
    id
    lastname]
  }
  ''';

  ...

Now you can use it in your Graphql Query or Mutation String like below

  ...

  const CURRENT_USER = '''
    query read{
      read {
      ...UserFragmentFull
      }
    }
    $UserFragment
  ''';

  ...

or

  ...

  const GET_BLOGS = '''
    query getBlogs{
      getBlog {
        title
        description
        tags
        
        author {
          ...UserFragmentFull
        }
    }
    $UserFragment
  ''';

  ...

Outside a Widget

Similar to withApollo or graphql HoC that passes the client to the component in react, you can call a graphql query from any part of your code base even in a your service class or in your Scoped MOdel or Bloc class. Example

  ...

  class AuthUtil{
    static Future<String> getToken() async {
      SharedPreferences prefs = await SharedPreferences.getInstance();
      return await prefs.getString('token');
    }

    static Future setToken(value) async {
      SharedPreferences prefs = await SharedPreferences.getInstance();
      return await prefs.setString('token', value);
    }

    static removeToken() async {
      SharedPreferences prefs = await SharedPreferences.getInstance();
      return await prefs.remove('token');
    }

    static clear() async {
      SharedPreferences prefs = await SharedPreferences.getInstance();
      return await prefs.clear();
    }
    
    static Future<bool> logIn(String username, String password) async {
      var token;

      QueryOptions queryOptions = QueryOptions(
          document: LOGIN,
          variables: {
            'username': username,
            'password': password
          }
      );

      if (result != null) {
        this.setToken(result);
        return clientProfile.value.query(queryOptions).then((result) async {

          if(result.data != null) {
            token = result.data['login']['token];
            notifyListeners();
            return token;
          } else {
            return throw Error;
          }

        }).catchError((error) {
            return throw Error;
        });
      } else
        return false;
    }
  }

  ...

In a scoped model:

  ...
class AppModel extends Model {

  String token = '';
  var currentUser = new Map <String, dynamic>();

  static AppModel of(BuildContext context) =>
      ScopedModel.of<AppModel>(context);

  void setToken(String value) {
    token = value;
    AuthUtil.setAppURI(value);
    notifyListeners();
  }


  String getToken() {
    if (token != null) return token;
    else AuthUtil.getToken();
  }

  getCurrentUser() {
    return currentUser;
  }

  Future<bool> isLoggedIn() async {

    var result = await AuthUtil.getToken();
    print(result);

    QueryOptions queryOptions = QueryOptions(
        document: CURRENT_USER
    );

    if (result != null) {
      print(result);
      this.setToken(result);
      return clientProfile.value.query(queryOptions).then((result) async {

        if(result.data != null) {
          currentUser = result.data['read'];
          notifyListeners();
          return true;
        } else {
          return false;
        }

      }).catchError((error) {
        print('''Error => $error''');
        return false;
      });
    } else
      return false;
  }
}

Roadmap

This is currently our roadmap, please feel free to request additions/changes.

FeatureProgress
Queries
Mutations
Subscriptions
Query polling
In memory cache
Offline cache sync
Optimistic results🔜
Client state management🔜
Modularity🔜
Documentation🔜

Contributing

Feel free to open a PR with any suggestions! We'll be actively working on the library ourselves. If you need control to the repo, please contact me Rex Raphael. Please fork and send your PRs to the v.1.0.0 branch.

This project follows the all-contributors specification. Contributions of any kind are welcome!

Libraries

flutter_graphql